Kauai Farmer's Markets

Kauai Farmer's Markets

This will come as no surprise, but the farmer's markets here are incredible.  The tropical climate means a year-round growing season, so even thought it is technically winter, the markets are stocked with fruits and vegetables.  About half of the produce I could find at home (tomatoes, kale, greens, squash, garlic, beans, broccoli, cauliflower, herbs, carrots) and the rest is never in season in Colorado or I've never heard of it!

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Cherry Peach Galette

Over the weekend, I made my annual trip to the Boulder Farmer's Market.  It is, hands down, the best market on the Front Range.  I've waxed poetic about it before and it never disappoints.  At this time of year, there was an abundance of fresh corn, perfectly ripe Palisades peaches, tomatoes, cherries, and peppers.  The harvest from our own garden has been limited due to a huge hail storm last month that obliterated the entire garden.  Some of it has bounced back, but we are a few weeks behind where everything should be.  I have basil and various greens, but only green tomatoes and sad-looking pepper plants.

The "Stunning as the Sunrise" description of these beets cracks me up.

The "Stunning as the Sunrise" description of these beets cracks me up.

I was lured in by a range of things at the market, including a huge box of tomatoes (I made large batches of this bolognese and this tomato sauce to freeze).  And then there were the peaches and cherries.  I couldn't resist... and since we abandoned the Whole30, it seemed appropriate to make a dessert.

Taking a break from the market to play in Boulder Creek and pick dandelions in the adjacent park.

Taking a break from the market to play in Boulder Creek and pick dandelions in the adjacent park.

My go-to dessert for summer fruit is typically pie, but I wanted something simpler so I searched for galette recipes and stumbled upon this one from Melissa Clark at the NY Times. I have her cookbook Cook This Now and have never been disappointed by a recipe and if you watch the video, she provides some helpful tips about how to improve a galette and get the right ratio of sugar to fruit depending on the type of fruit.  Her advice is that tart stone fruits need more sugar and cornstarch whereas berries and cherries need less.  If you are working with fruit that isn't perfectly ripe or doesn't have a strong flavor, a trick to ramp up flavor is to spread a thin layer of jam over the rolled out dough before adding the fruit.

Look at all of that delicious fruit!

Look at all of that delicious fruit!

I used peaches and cherries to fill my galette, both of which were at peak ripeness.  As I usually do in desserts, I erred on the side of less sugar (the peaches and cherries were both sweet on their own) and added more fruit.  My Mom, Blythe and I enjoyed the galette, which was absolutely delicious - this will be my new go-to dough recipe for galettes.  Conveniently, I doubled the dough recipe and froze the other half so I'll be prepared to make my next one at a moment's notice.

It is safe to say that Blythe enjoyed her first galette.

It is safe to say that Blythe enjoyed her first galette.

Cherry Peach Galette
Tweaked just a bit from Melissa Clark via the NY Times
Yield = 8 servings

Ingredients
For the dough:

  • 1 ⅓ cups/165 grams all-purpose flour
  • 1 tablespoon/15 grams sugar
  • ½ teaspoon/3 grams fine sea salt
  • 1 large egg
  •  Heavy cream, as needed
  • 1 stick/113 grams unsalted butter, cut into big pieces
  • 2 teaspoons/10 milliliters lemon juice
  • ½ teaspoon/4 grams grated lemon zest (optional)

For the filling:

  • 4 cups of peaches (cubed) and cherries (pitted and halved)
  • 1/4 cup sugar, to taste (I cut this in half from the original recipe)
  • Pinch of salt
  • Juice and grated zest of 1/2 lemon (optional - I omitted this for this particular fruit combination)
  • 3 to 4 tablespoons/25 to 35 grams cornstarch

Preparation

MAKE THE CRUST:

  1. In a food processor fitted with a steel blade, or in a large bowl, pulse or mix together flour, sugar and salt. In a measuring cup, lightly beat the egg, then add just enough cream to get to 1/3 cup. Lightly whisk the egg and cream together.
  2. Add butter to flour mixture and pulse or use a pastry cutter or your fingers to break up the butter. If using a food processor, do not over-process; you need chickpea-size chunks of butter. Drizzle the egg mixture (up to 1/4 cup) over the dough and pulse or stir until it just starts to come together but is still mostly large crumbs. Mix in lemon juice and zest if using.
  3. Put dough on lightly floured counter and pat it together to make one uniform piece. Flatten into a disk, wrap in plastic and chill for 2 hours, or up to 3 days.
  4. Heat the oven to 400 degrees. Roll the dough out to a 12-inch round (it can be ragged). Transfer to a rimmed baking sheet lined with parchment paper and chill while preparing the filling.

MAKE THE FILLING:

  1. Toss together fruit, all but a tablespoon of sugar, the salt, the lemon juice and zest, and the cornstarch. Use more cornstarch for juicy stone fruit and less for blueberries, raspberries and figs. Pile fruit on the dough circle, leaving a 1 1/2-inch border. Gently fold the pastry over the fruit, pleating to hold it in (sloppy is fine). Brush pastry generously with leftover egg and cream mixture. Sprinkle remaining sugar on the crust.
  2. Bake for 35 to 45 minutes, until the filling bubbles up vigorously and the crust is golden. Cool for at least 20 minutes on wire rack. Serve warm or at room temperature (and with a dollop of whipped cream or a scoop of ice cream if you'd like).

  

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Good Eggs

Good Eggs Logo.png

Good Eggs is a website and delivery service that gives you the opportunity to order food from local farmers and artisanal food markets.  I read about it in the New York Times this week - what a great idea!  Good Eggs opened in February and currently operates in San Francisco and has pilot programs running in Brooklyn, Los Angeles, and New Orleans.  

Once you select a city, you choose a delivery date and then begin shopping!  You can select from different sellers in various categories - dairy/eggs, fruits and veggies, baked goods and sweets, meat and fish, etc.  You can pick up your order or have it delivered for just $3.99.

The products aren't cheap, but they are comparable to what you'd pay at a farmer's market or artisanal bakery.  In San Francisco, they are currently taking pre-orders for Thanksgiving turkeys, pies, and side dishes that look divine.  Has anyone tried Good Eggs?  I'd love to hear how it actually works.  The New York Times article suggest there are still a few glitches (including some really early delivery windows), but that the products were worth it.

Sweet Corn Ice Cream with Cherry Compote

Sweet Corn Ice Cream with Cherry Compote

All week I've been reading about how summer is over.  It doesn't help that football season started and swimming pools have closed... but it was 96°F in Denver today and it certainly seems to me that it's still the season for shorts and swimsuits, sunglasses and flip-flops, and corn on the cob and ice cream.

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Apple Cranberry Crumble

Apple Cranberry Crumble

I'm guessing that, regardless of where you live, there is an abundance of apples in your area.  I sampled about five varieties on Saturday before settling on Jonagolds.  We've been in between stone fruit and apple season here and I haven't made much dessert in the last month.  I found myself day dreaming of baked apples and cinnamon and wondered if I could meld my favorite dessert (Plum Crumble) into one containing apples?  It turns out that the crumble topping is just as delicious and crunchy and buttery with apples underneath as it is with plums.

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